Group Learning Activities: Cooperative Learning Meets Accountability

Effective Group Work Strategies for the College Classroom

Love or hate it, group work can create powerful learning experiences for students. From understanding course content to developing problem solving, teamwork and communication skills, group work is an effective teaching strategy whose lessons may endure well beyond the end of a course. So why is it that so many students (and some faculty) hate it?

If you’re looking to change the way your students think about group work, you’ll want to download this FREE special report Effective Group Work Strategies for the College Classroom.

Effective Group Work Strategies for the College Classroom

Download your copy of this report today! It's FREE to Faculty Focus members.

Ask your students to get into groups and you’re likely to hear a few groans. Usually, they just sit there for a few moments, and it’s only after much urging do they look at those sitting nearby and move minimally in the direction of getting themselves seated together as a group. This lack of enthusiasm for group work is, at some level, a recognition that it is much easier to sit and take notes rather than work in a group and take ownership. The resistance also derives from past experiences in groups where not much happened, or where some members did nothing while other did more than their fair share of the work.

This special report features 10 insightful articles from The Teaching Professor that will help you create more effective group learning activities and grading strategies as well as tips for dealing with group members who are “hitchhiking” (getting a free ride from the group) or “hijacking” (dominating the group effort).

Here are the articles you will find in Effective Group Work Strategies for the College Classroom:

  • Leaders with Incentives: Groups That Performed Better
  • Dealing with Students Who Hate Working in Groups
  • Group Work That Inspires Cooperation and Competition
  • Understanding the Group Exam Experience
  • Use the Power of Groups to Help You Teach
  • Pairing vs. Small Groups: A Model for Analytical Collaboration
  • Group Quizzes: More Positive Outcomes
  • Using Collaborative Groups to Teach Literature and Theory
  • Small Group Discussion Tasks
  • Feedback Forms for Peer Assessment in Groups

Faculty who regularly use group work are always on the lookout for new and better ways of handling those behaviors that compromise group effectiveness—group members who don’t carry their weight and the negative attitudes students frequently bring with them to group work. This report will show you how other educators have effectively solved these problems while incorporating collaborative learning strategies in their classes.

Effective Group Work Strategies for the College Classroom

Download your copy of this report today! It's FREE to Faculty Focus members.

Effective Group Work Strategies for the College Classroom is yours free when you sign up for Faculty Focus, our new online information resource for faculty in the higher education industry.

Faculty Focus contains a wealth of valuable material – not just about cooperative learning, but all of today’s hot button issues that are important to faculty and administrators. It’s packed with tips, best practices and other actionable information you can use on the topics that impact your students, your school and your work, including:

  • Instructional Design
  • Faculty Development
  • Distance Learning
  • Classroom Management
  • Educational Assessment
  • Faculty Evaluation
  • Learning Styles
  • Curriculum Development
  • Community College Issues
  • Trends in Higher Education
  • Learning Communities
  • And much, much more.

If you’d like to change the way your students think about group work, you’ll want to download Effective Group Work Strategies for the College Classroom a new special report that will help you create more effective group learning activities and grading strategies.

Effective Group Work Strategies for the College Classroom

Download your copy of this report today! It's FREE to Faculty Focus members.

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