CURRENT ARTICLE • December 6th information overload computer key

Top Online Course Design Mistakes

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Although online education has been around for nearly 20 years, I still see a number of common mistakes among online course developers. Here are the top course design mistakes in online education and how to avoid them in your courses.

Too much content
When I hire someone to design an online course, I invariably get too much content. Developers will assign over 150 pages of dense, academic reading per week, along with websites and other resources. Covering all of this content would take far more time than can be expected of students, leading them to pick and choose what they think is important, not what the course developer thinks is important.

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OTHER RECENT ARTICLES

students texting December 5

Teaching Students about Their Digital Footprints

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Our students live in an online world. They’re emotionally and physically attached to their devices and many of their relationships exist within technology. As educators, there are many ways that we have had to adapt to this changing landscape of communication within our teaching, and when I look around my institution, I think we’re doing a remarkable job at keeping up with the rapid pace of change.


December 2

PA026: Recording Videos for Your Classes, Part 2

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This week, we continue our discussion on recording videos for our courses. We discuss recording techniques using a variety of recording methods. One of the most important things that goes into your welcome video is a brief explanation about who you are and why you love to teach. This initial introduction helps to humanize the course and sends of message of approachability.


STEM students working on a problem. December 1

Team-Based Learning: Strategies for Getting Started [Transcript]

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Making sure students come to class prepared is an ongoing challenge for all faculty members.

With the Readiness Assurance Process, Team-Based Learning (TBL) helps instructors and students alike get past this age-old obstacle. This seminar transcript delves into TBL’s problem-solving framework and discovers how you can use it to design team activities to deepen students’ problem-solving experience.

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student studying in library December 1

How to Integrate Self-Regulated Learning into Your Courses [Transcript]

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With so much material to teach, it seems luxurious or even indulgent to spend time thinking about thinking. However, there are distinct benefits of focusing some effort on developing self-regulated learning (SRL) practices among your students.

Incorporating aspects of self-regulated learning into your courses can improve your students’ exam performance, reading and listening comprehension, written and designed products, and problem-solving skills. Its name might suggest otherwise, but self-regulated learning—the skill set and practice of strategically planning, monitoring, controlling, and evaluating ones’ own learning—can be taught.

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college classroom December 1

Using Brief Interventions to Maximize Student Learning [Transcript]

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The shift toward student-centered learning has transformed our classrooms, and it’s no longer enough to be a subject-matter expert. Instructors have to not only know the material their students need to learn, but they also have to have a reasonably good grasp of how students learn it.

The task is to master both, because that’s when the real learning magic happens. That’s the idea behind cognitive theory and its application in higher education. And while it took you years of study to earn credentials in your discipline, you can learn how to apply relevant aspects of cognitive theory to your courses in far less time.

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writing on sticky note December 1

Preparing a Learner-Centered Syllabus

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The Oxford Dictionary defines “syllabus” as “an outline of the subjects in a course of study or teaching.”

“Students who read a good syllabus are more likely to feel that course strategies have been designed to help them reach their goals, rather than merely as busywork or, worse, to torture them” ~ Slattery & Carlson, 2013, p. 159.
The syllabus literature tends to focus on “Here’s what makes a good syllabus,” but hasn’t addressed the following questions nearly as well: “What are the purposes of the syllabus?” and “What are the syllabus’ implications for learning?”

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student blogging December 1

Sample To-Do Online Teaching Checklist

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Daily Priorities Check “Questions for Instructor” thread; respond to questions Check internal course email; respond to questions Check phone messages; respond to students Check dropbox; grade submissions and provide feedback Participate in discussion thread; record grades and comment codes on…...

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Extra Credit Options to Promote Learning

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It’s time to hand back the exams, and no one has done well. You’re as disappointed as your students will be when they see their grades. How do you get the class back on track? Offering extra credit assignments is one approach, but will that just lead to more problems?

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students paying attention December 1

Recognizing the Signs of Underpreparedness

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Take a few moments to list your top three or four frustrations with students who are not prepared to successfully complete your course—students who almost seem destined to fail your course.

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