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What’s an Empowered Student?

That was the question, followed by, “Are they students who want to take over the classroom?” “No,” I replied, “it’s about how students approach learning—motivated, confident, and ready to tackle the task.”


How to Integrate Self-Regulated Learning into Your Courses

Led by Linda B. Nilson, PhD, director of the Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation at Clemson University, this online seminar will prepare you to select, adapt, design, and integrate proven self-regulated learning assignments and activities into the courses you’re teaching right now.

Online Seminar • Tuesday, June 24th, 2014 • 1:00 pm Central

Student Motivation: Moving Beyond “Leading a Horse to Water”

When it comes to student motivation, does the axiom, “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink” apply? Although I believe that, as instructors, we cannot force motivation and learning upon students, we do play a vital role regarding student motivation and a student’s ability to gain knowledge and proficiency in the subject matter.


Nine Strategies to Spark Adult Students’ Intrinsic Motivation

Are you an instructor who struggles to change the mindset of your students? Do you find that the students’ first questions are about grades rather than the content of the course? Do you want your students to obtain good grades but realize that the grade is a result of a student who is engaged in the topic with passion, interest, and exuberance? It is this passion to learn that can be described as intrinsic motivation.


A Quiz Design that Motivates Students

Many faculty members use quizzes to keep students prepared and present in class. The approach often tends to be punitive, however, motivating students by extrinsic means. Karen Braun and Drew Sellers, who teach beginning accounting courses, wanted to use quizzes in the usual ways—to get students coming to class having done the reading, to arrive in class on time, and to participate in class discussion, but they wanted their quizzes to be more about intrinsic motivation and less about assessment. How did they achieve that objective? They incorporated a number of “motivational” design features into their use of quizzes.


Recent Seminars


Teaching Unprepared Students: Strategies that Work

More and more students are arriving on campus without the tools they need to succeed. Some lack skills, others lack motivation, and many just don’t seem to “get” that college takes hard work and commitment. Led by Ken Alford and Tyler Griffin, this seminar provides guidance on how to get unprepared students better aligned with the demands of college.

Online Seminar • Recorded on Thursday, November 21st, 2013

Six Tips for Keeping Students Engaged

When you look around your classroom, do you see students texting under their desks, or worse yet, right out in the open? Do you have students who skip class, arrive late or leave early, or come unprepared? If so, Christy Price, EdD has some words of advice for you.


Student Motivation: It’s More Complicated Than We Think

Motivation—there are two kinds: intrinsic, which involves doing something because we want to do it, and extrinsic, which is doing something because we have to do it. A negative relationship exists between the two. Extrinsic motivation undermines intrinsic motivation. Students won’t be attending class because they want to if attending class is required. As a result of this negative relationship, students don’t have much intrinsic motivation because it’s been beaten out of them by most extrinsic educational experiences. And that’s a nutshell version of how most teachers understand motivation.


How Can I Get Students to Take Responsibility for Their Own Learning?

When students don’t take responsibility for their own learning, it creates philosophical and practical problems for the instructor and can affect other students’ learning. This 20 minute video program gives you a theoretical basis and practical tools to boost student accountability in the college classroom.


Five Factors that Affect Online Student Motivation

Understanding what motivates online learners is important because motivated students are more likely to engage in activities that help them learn and achieve, says Brett Jones, associate professor of educational psychology at Virginia Tech. Based on an extensive review of the literature on student motivation, Jones has developed the MUSIC model of student motivation, which identifies five main factors that contribute to student motivation: eMpowerment, Usefulness, Success, Interest, and Caring.