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Three Strategies for Creating Meaningful Learning Experiences

Do you ever wonder whether your students care about your course material? Do you question whether your students appreciate how the information you address in class is relevant to them? Do you feel like there is often a mismatch between your intentions for your class and what your students actually want to learn?


Recent Seminars


Strategies for Making Your Courses Relevant and Engaging

This seminar focuses on maximizing the relevance of your courses and piquing students’ interest by adjusting your approach rather than dramatically changing course content. Specifically, you will learn how to use frequent needs assessments, techniques that heighten student engagement, and daily feedback to ensure that your students understand why course content is relevant to their degree programs, their lives, and that real world waiting for them after graduation.

Online Seminar • Recorded on Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

How Can I Effectively Teach Unprepared Students?

Learn principles and practices you can implement immediately to provide learning opportunities for unprepared students and motivate them to become engaged learners. This program takes a broad-spectrum approach, addressing motivation, responsibility, and communication practices and provides tested techniques to address these key issues.


How Do I Build Community in My Classroom?

Mixing research findings, personal experience, and practical tips, Milton Cox explains how community in the classroom supports student learning and shares proven practices for increasing a sense of community in your course.


Six Tips for Keeping Students Engaged

When you look around your classroom, do you see students texting under their desks, or worse yet, right out in the open? Do you have students who skip class, arrive late or leave early, or come unprepared? If so, Christy Price, EdD has some words of advice for you.


Reflections on Teaching: From Surviving to Thriving

Editor’s Note: In part one of this article, the author shared openly some of the mistakes he made early in his teaching career. In this entry, he outlines some of the changes he’s made to his teaching over the years and the principles he uses to guide his teaching.

I had known it all along at some level, but now it suddenly became glaringly obvious to me. Deep down, sometimes out of conscious reach, students want to be transformed and their lives made more useful, productive, and powerful. I added the following new goal to my personal mission statement:


Who Are You? Putting Faces on Virtual Learners

One of the first and most difficult tasks an online instructor faces is how to establish the presence of a learning community. Learning in isolation may be possible, but it’s neither enjoyable nor complete, and many online students end up quitting or failing the course simply because they miss the classmate support that is readily available in face-to-face classes. To ignore the importance of peer learning and personal connection in any classroom, including those in which participants might not physically meet, is to deny the significance of social interaction in learning.


The Most Overlooked Items That Can Help Keep Online Students Engaged

Student engagement is a popular topic and the overwhelming majority of the information on this topic is concentrated on the big issues of keeping students engaged, such as the importance of faculty presence in the classroom, adhering to deadlines and responding to students in a timely manner, and giving thorough feedback on assignments.


Humor in the Classroom: 40 Years of Research

You have to admire scholars willing to look at 40 years of research on any topic, and this particular review is useful to faculty interested in understanding the role of humor in education. It starts with definitions, functions, and theories of humor. It identifies a wide range of different types of humor. It reviews empirical findings, including the all-important question of whether using humor helps students learn. And finally, this 30-page review concludes with concrete advice and suggestions for future research. It’s one of those articles that belong in even modest instructional libraries—imagine having to track down the better-than-100 references in the bibliography.


Motivating Students: From Apathetic to Inspired

Modern learners have a different mind-set about education, but that doesn’t mean they don’t want to learn. They just go about it differently. During this seminar, you will learn the small changes you can make to your course design and instructional methodology to better engage students and foster accountability.

Online Seminar • Recorded on Thursday, March 28th, 2013