ff-tp-blog April 1

What We Have and Haven’t Learned

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I’ve been asked to give a talk that explores some of the top teaching-learning lessons learned in the past 15 years. It’s a good reflection exercise that also brings up those lessons we haven’t learned or aren’t yet finished learning.

I’m figuring the best place to start is with technology. During the past 15 years, technology has become a dominating force in every aspect of our lives and that includes education. As it descended upon higher education, we didn’t start out asking the right question. We got focused on the mechanics of “how does it work” (or, in the case of those us not all that adept at mastering technology, “why doesn’t it work?”) and “what can we do with it?” The better question is whether a new technology promotes learning. We are asking that question now, but still struggle with the balance between what’s possible and what promotes learning.



ff-icon-default-200x200 July 16, 2014

Nearly 75 Percent of Faculty Incorporated Technology into their Teaching in the Past Year

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When it comes to technology in the classroom, phrases like “faculty resistance” and the importance of getting “faculty buy-in” are tossed around with great frequency. But is that perception still valid? Are all instructors so set in their ways, skeptical of anything new, and fearful of deviating from what they’ve done that it’s nearly impossible to get them to try something new?


ff-icon-default-200x200 February 3, 2014

2014 Horizon Report Identifies Top Ed Tech Trends, Challenges

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The New Media Consortium (NMC) and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) have released the 2014 Horizon Report. This year’s NMC Horizon Report identifies the “Online, Hybrid, and Collaborative Learning” and “Social Media Use in Learning” as fast moving trends likely to drive substantive changes in higher education over the next one to two years.


ff-tp-blog June 26, 2013

Dead Ideas That Limit Teaching and Learning

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Dead ideas that limit teaching and learning—that was the topic of Professor Diane Pike’s plenary session at the recent Teaching Professor Conference. There’s a tyranny associated with dead ideas. They limit and constrain our thinking, and can lead us in the wrong direction. An idea may pass on without us noticing, and discovering it is dead can be provocative. Consider, for example, these three ideas that Pike proposed.


TeacherClassroom230 December 12, 2012

Top 12 Teaching and Learning Articles for 2012, part 2

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It wouldn’t be the end of the year without a few top 10 lists. As we say goodbye to 2012, we’re doing our list with a little twist: the top 12 articles of 2012. Each article’s popularity ranking is based on a combination of the number of reader comments and social shares, e-newsletter open and click-through rates, web traffic and other reader engagement metrics.


F_1708641_web April 11, 2011

What Can Be Done to Boost Academic Rigor?

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When it comes to college students and studying, the general rule most first-year students hear goes something like this. “For every one credit hour in which you enroll, you will spend approximately two to three hours outside of class studying and working on assignments for the course.” For a full-time student carrying 12 credits that equals at least 24 hours of studying per week.