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Faculty Development


Six Principles for Measuring and Communicating the Value of Your Faculty Development Center

This is an era of rapid transformation and heightened opportunities for Faculty Development Centers (FDCs). There is a growing realization that faculty development can be a crucial component in addressing some of the most significant challenges facing higher education, including technology’s impact on teaching, reliance on part-time and distance faculty, and student success.


Recent Seminars


Outcomes-Based Assessment for Teaching & Learning Centers

Faculty development centers rarely operate under financial models that allow them to prove that they are cost-effective. It is therefore important that faculty support centers be able to measure and communicate the value of what they do, particularly in today’s budget climate. This seminar will give you a reliable framework for measuring tangible outcomes for your center and communicating these outcomes clearly to others.

Online Seminar • Recorded on Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

Making the Most of Professional Development Days

I am on my way to speak at another professional development day at a college. I do these events with misgivings—frequently persuading myself on the way home that I really shouldn’t be doing them.

Some time ago, a colleague and I reviewed the literature on interventions to improve instruction. If I were to do that paper again, I would pay special attention to those changes that improved student learning. The research we looked at then did not give workshops very high marks. If teachers changed, they did so right after the event, but soon reverted to their old ways of doing things


From Rusty to Robust: Overcoming the Challenges to Effective Faculty Development

The past 10 years have witnessed some massive growing pains in education. Nearly all aspects at all levels have been touched by efforts to reform in an attempt to create meaningful learning opportunities for today’s students. New tools, skills, approaches, and media have redefined the way we create those experiences, and educators who don’t learn and engage in them will see themselves become increasingly irrelevant. In short, faculty development now more than ever is necessary to an institution’s viability.


A Checklist for Effective Faculty Development Programs

Faculty development has become a priority at many academic institutions as a way to improve the quality of academic programs and to respond to emerging faculty, student, program, and industry needs.


McGraw-Hill Education and Magna Publications Launch Magna Campus to Support Faculty Development in Higher Education

Professional development in the higher education industry is becoming increasingly important as shifts in student demographics, pedagogy and classroom technology usage mean that faculty require a new generation of training tools. To help educators respond effectively to these challenges, McGraw-Hill Education today announced the launch of Magna Campus, the first professional development product created through the collaboration between Magna Publications and the McGraw-Hill Learning Institute, the company’s professional development unit designed to help faculty navigate new and emerging educational technologies.


It’s Time to Face What Isn’t Working in Our Courses and Find Out Why

Not everything we do in our courses works as well as we’d like. Sometimes it’s a new assignment that falls flat, other times it’s something that consistently disappoints. For example, let’s take a written assignment that routinely delivers work that is well below our expectations. It might be a paper that reports facts but never ties them together, an essay that repeats arguments but never takes a stand, or journal entries that barely scratch the surface of deep ideas.


Creating Faculty Learning Communities: 16 Recommendations

Faculty Learning Communities go beyond the common faculty development opportunities. These small, multidisciplinary groups bring about important teaching and learning enhancements and can have a profound effect on the culture of an institution. In this seminar, Dr. Milton Cox provides clear and practical guidance on how to set up a successful Faculty Learning Community within your institution

Online Seminar • Recorded on Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

Professional Faculty Development: The Necessary Fourth Leg

The well-known three-legged stool of academic life—teaching, research, and service—has been assumed to cover the main responsibilities of faculty in academic communities. But is there a missing leg that would add strength and stability to the stool? I propose there is. It’s professional faculty development, and I would also propose that faculty committed to teaching should be its most articulate advocates.


Teaching Circles: A Low-Cost, High-Benefit Way to Engage Faculty

For the past three years I have directed a small program that has produced big results at Tusculum College. For as little as $3,000 per year, our college has increased its sense of campus community, helped with current faculty development, more quickly integrated new faculty, and modeled scholarly discussions for students. Officially the program goes by the name “The Teaching and Learning Initiative,” but it has acquired the nickname “teaching circles.”


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