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academic integrity in online education


A Lesson in Academic Integrity as Students Feel the Injustice of Plagiarism

In an effort to make my lessons about plagiarism and the appropriate citation of sources more personal for the students in my rhetoric and research classes, I now use an assignment that forces them into the role of victim rather than thief. The results of my most recent experience with this approach were encouraging.


Confronting Cheating: A Legal Primer and Tool Kit

Cheating strikes at the core of your school’s integrity. It creates an unethical environment among your students, and ultimately diminishes the quality and reputation of your institution. Here’s what you can do about it.


Academic Integrity: Examining Two Common Approaches

Any effort to fundamentally change a school’s approach to academic integrity requires an understanding of its current organizational response to cheating (Bertram Gallant, 2008). Organizational approaches to student cheating form a continuum from highly decentralized to highly centralized, and most schools fall somewhere on this spectrum. The more decentralized a school’s response to cheating is,


Do’s and Don’ts for Promoting Academic Integrity

Donald McCabe’ s 2005 article “Cheating Among College And University Students: A North American Perspective” is often cited for its sobering statistics regarding the prevalence of cheating in higher education.

The numbers are alarming and do require a serious response, but have you ever turned the numbers upside down? For example, if 42 percent of college students admit to working with others on individual assignments, that means 58 percent aren’t getting help from others and those students would like you to do something about the 42 percent. If 38 percent admit to plagiarizing, that means 62 percent aren’t plagiarizing and those students expect you to do something about the 38 percent.


Promoting Academic Integrity

In a recent conversation, a faculty member expressed great dismay at the amount of cheating taking place in higher education and the cavalier attitude of many students toward it. His dismay is well founded. Depending on the study (and there have been many) anywhere between 40 to 60% of students report that they have cheated and they indicate a much higher percentage of their peers have as well. The faculty member I was talking to then went into a detailed description of all the measures he took to prevent cheating.


Building a Culture of Academic Integrity

The truth is most colleges and universities struggle with academic dishonesty. But the schools that have had the most success with remedying cheating are the ones that focus on transforming culture rather than changing behavior. Learn how with a copy of this white paper.


Tips for Preventing Plagiarism among College Students

For some students, a writing assignment takes weeks of research, writing and revisions. For others, the ingredients are more along the lines of Google, CTRL+C and CTRL+V. And for others still, the assignment is nothing more than a transaction with an online essay mill.


Turnitin Study Examines ‘Copy and Paste’ Plagiarism

When students need to write a paper, where do they go? A study released last month on plagiarism found that social and user-generated websites are the most popular resources, followed by academic and homework-related sites. Cheat sites and paper mills comprised less than 15 percent of the total resources used and showed the most significant decline over the period examined.


Recent Seminars


How to Detect and Prevent Plagiarism in the Online Classroom

This seminar provides a blueprint for preventing and detecting plagiarism in the online classroom whether it’s “copy and paste” plagiarism or material that is written for students by paper mills.

audio Online Seminar • Recorded on Tuesday, May 17th, 2011

Five Ways to Tackle Cheating in College

Consider the following exam day scenario. While the students are taking their exam, you look up from the paper you’re grading and see a student repeatedly looking at another student’s exam. When your eyes meet his, he appears nervous. What should you do next?


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