Learn how to apply the latest neuroscience research to your teaching

How the Brain Learns: Implications for Teaching and Learning

Every educator wonders from time to time (or maybe all the time!) what his or her students are thinking. But what about how they’re thinking?


There’s much to be learned from the study of brain function that can have a profound impact on pedagogy. Recent neuroscience findings shed new light on the external and internal factors that affect acquiring, processing, and learning new knowledge.

In a new Magna Online Seminar How the Brain Learns: Implications for Teaching and Learning, two leaders in the field of metacognition review what science now tells us about the learning process and share concrete classroom strategies and methods that are informed by that science.

This seminar by Leslie Myers and Melissa Terlicki is based on the highest-rated session from the 2013 Teaching Professor Conference.

During the seminar, the two presenters show that a deeper understanding of how the brain works can guide us toward pedagogy that:

  • Creates a healthy environment for learning
  • Structures the presentation of material for optimal comprehension
  • Helps students form critical connections and elaborate on their learning
  • Promotes the long-term retention of material
  • Strengthens foundational learning

Topics Covered

How the Brain Learns: Implications for Teaching and Learning surveys the current landscape of neuroscience research, citing recent findings about issues including:

  • How emotion and motivation contribute to learning
  • How the brain receives information
  • How information is sorted, processed, and prioritized
  • How environmental factors contribute to the acquisition of knowledge
  • How the brain physically develops as knowledge builds
  • The importance of relevance and engagement in the learning environment

With those findings as a backdrop, the seminar presenters examine pedagogical methods that can leverage the brain’s natural processes to enhance learning. Specifically, they provide a toolbox of classroom techniques to help you:

  • Establish an environment that promotes learning
  • Dial into student motivators
  • Deliver course content in ways that optimize comprehension
  • Create strong foundational learning for students to build on
  • Encourage the formation of critical knowledge connections and associations
  • Enhance retention of course material

You’ll gain greater insight into what drives the learning process in your students. That in turn will help you adapt your teaching in ways that maximize students’ desire and ability to learn, with improved learning outcomes as a result.

How the Brain Learns: Implications for Teaching and Learning will provide you with valuable perspectives on:

  • How learning “works”
  • How to apply that knowledge in the classroom
  • What techniques you can employ to support your efforts
  • How to get started, how to assess your results, and how to build on your successes
  • How to engage other faculty in the process

This seminar is now available on CD. The recording includes the complete transcript and all supplemental materials.

An optional Campus Access License is available for an additional $200. It allows the purchasing institution to upload the CD of the seminar onto the institution’s password-protected internal website for unlimited access by the entire campus community.

Intended Audience

How the Brain Learns: Implications for Teaching and Learning is a valuable professional development experience for faculty at any community college or two- or four-year college or university, regardless of discipline and regardless of career stage.

If you’re a new faculty member, it will help you hone your pedagogy with a solid understanding of the science behind the learning process. If you’re a seasoned educator, it will provide new criteria by which to measure and, if appropriate, refine your teaching practices.

email

If you have any questions contact Customer Service at 800-433-0499 or (608) 246-3590 or email us at support@facultyfocus.com.