November 30, 2016

Copyright Compliance Made Simple: Six Rules for Course Design

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As those tuned into issues of copyright and fair use in educational settings are well aware, copyright infringement lawsuits against colleges and universities are neither hypothetical nor theoretical. Over the last several years, a number of colleges and universities (including university systems) around the country have experienced being named defendants in such lawsuits.

Here are six copyright compliance rules to keep in mind as you design your courses.

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diversity in classroom November 30, 2016

Breaking the Code of Silence about Race in the Classroom

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Racially-charged issues are all around us — controversy over the killing of unarmed black men by white police officers; the slaughter of nine black people during a Charleston, S.C. church service by a young white man who said he wanted to start a race war; the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement on college campuses; the inflammatory rhetoric about race that has been aired over and over in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election. Yet, unless we happen to be teaching a course directly related to race, such as black history or the psychology of racial identity, most of us dodge the topic.

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Pensive college student using laptop November 30, 2016

What Are We Communicating to Students When We Write?

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Do we communicate more with students in writing than we used to? I think so. In addition to the course syllabus, the usual handouts, and written feedback on papers, projects, and performances, we now share all kinds of electronic messages with students. We exchange emails, post announcements on course management systems, and participate in online discussions. Those who use PowerPoint tend to make rather text-heavy slides. And if you happen to teach online, then virtually all your communication with students occurs via some written format.


students working in group November 30, 2016

How Can I Structure a Flipped Lesson? [Transcript]

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There’s more to the flip than just telling students to complete the work before class and then turning them loose when they arrive in the classroom.

Chaos will emerge. Students will get frustrated. You will get overwhelmed. Learning will not happen.

It’s a simple lesson: if you want to flip to good effect, you have to have a strategy. Relieve some of your fears and concerns by using this four-part lesson plan model to organize your flipped classroom and ensure that you’re connecting the pre-class work to the flipped learning experience.

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erasing test answers November 30, 2016

Writing Better Multiple-Choice Questions

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Eleven years ago, I discovered a life-changing pedagogy called team-based learning. It let me do things in large classrooms that I didn't think was possible. I found that the key to successful team-based learning was writing really good multiple-choice questions. I would like to look at the multiple-choice format overall, including some of the vocabulary we use when looking at the literature on writing multiple-choice questions.

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online student typing November 30, 2016

Exam Rubric

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A: Addresses each question and all its parts thoroughly; incorporates relevant course content into responses; uses specific information from case in response.

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Four Key Questions About Large Classes November 30, 2016

Teaching Large Classes: Course Design and Teaching Checklists

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(1) List your top three or four concerns about teaching large classes         (2) Identify the parts of those concerns over which you have some level of control or capacity to change         (3)…...

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three students with writing assignment November 29, 2016

Strategies for Deep and Lasting Learning: Questions for Reflection, Self-Assessment, and Discussion

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Reflect on these questions and then discuss them with a colleague, with your department, or with other interested parties:

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movie film November 29, 2016

The Classic Movies Come to Class

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If you are a professor of a certain age, you may have had the experience that I had in my first semester of teaching. I asked, “Who’s seen Norma Rae?” (I wanted to use it to illustrate that working in a mill causes hearing loss.) “Who’s seen Young Frankenstein?” (I wanted to highlight the Abby Normal brain.) The response from students was “Huh?” Today’s students haven’t seen the same movies most of us have, and they don’t seem a generation inclined to watch old, classic movies. A movie in black and white? Forget it.

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group work November 29, 2016

Group Work: Assessment and Grading

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Grading small group work can be a challenge. Most instructors use a combination of individual product and group product, often developing a percentage split based upon the assignment (e.g. 70% individual work and 30% group work).

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